Posing for Poshterity – Feet in the Air

Image

Call them “photographers for rent” or “personal paparazzi”… you can hire someone to capture your travel journey or out-in-the town-adventure frame-by-frame.    (http://blog.flytographer.com/category/nyc/

http://v1.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/Page/document/hubsv3/Travel/travelPages?activities=photography

Advertisements

Springing into Action – Feet in the Air

Image

In this 2011 photo released by the International Triathlon Union (ITU), elite female athletes dive into the Schwarzsee Lake for the start of their world championship swim.

The Dextro Energy Triathlon took place in Kitzbuhel, Austria. (AP Photo/ITU, Delly Carr)

 

http://news.yahoo.com/photos/photo-released-international-triathlon-union-elite-women-dive-photo-175238999.html

Hanging onto Slim Hope…Feet in the Air

 

Image

After a monsoon in 2013, a boy dangled from a power line before diving into an overflowing Ganges River.  Allahabad, India

 

http://www.philipchircop.com/post/71403192364/images-from-2013-a-boy-dangling-allahabad

Photo: Sanjay Kanojia/Agence France-Presse, Getty Images, Source:New York Times

 

See also:   http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2346033/India-Floods-2013-Rescuers-pull-bodies-River-Ganges-mud-left-landslides-death-toll-monsoon-flooding-northern-India-rises-nearly-600.html

“Traitors’” Feet in the Air

Image

Branded as turncoats and accused of committing treason, eight men were hung in public view by the British near the end of the War of 1812. This image depicting feet in the air is a part of a mural by Lori Le Mare.  (http://www.pinterest.com/mmrocks/fieldcote-museum-exhibit-by-lori-lemare/)

The Fieldcote Museum in Ancaster Ontario has become a centre of the “Bloody Assize” commemoration.  Apparently, several visitors to the museum have acknowledged a family connection to these infamous Upper Canadian settlers. Mark McNeil (mmcneil@thespec.com) wrote in the Hamilton Spectator: “Time has a way of revising attitudes. Yesterday’s traitor might be seen today as an unfortunate rebel. One man’s turncoat is another man’s hero. And maybe the British army was doing things that deserved disloyalty, such as throwing people out of their homes and eating their food”.

 http://www.thespec.com/news-story/2243205-bloody-assize-revisited/

 Photo Source:

https://www.google.com/search?q=lori+le+mare+studio&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=VSAFU-_0BMq8yAHis4HwBA&ved=0CFUQsAQ&biw=1366&bih=566

Team Feet in the Air

Image

Canadian basketball team jump for joy in front of the Olympic rings inside the London 2012 Olympic Village in Stratford, east London. July 24, 2012.

 

Shopped original photo by: AP Photo/Suzanne Plunkett, Pool

 http://onomeister.wordpress.com/2012/07/29/onomeisters-olympics-photo-of-the-day-go-canadian-womens-basketball/

Pedestrian Strolls and Promenades in Italy

Image

“The magic of the street is the mingling of the errand and the epiphany, and no such gardens seem to have flourished in Italy, perhaps because they were unneeded.  For the Italian pre-dinner stroll – the passaggiata – many towns close down their main streets to wheeled traffic. The street is the pivotal social space, for meeting, debating, courting, buying and selling.” 

      Quoted from: Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking, pp. 178-179.  http://www.amazon.com/Wanderlust-History-Walking-Rebecca-Solnit/dp/0140286012

Solnit quotes Edwin Denby: “In ancient Italian towns the narrow main street at dusk becomes a kind of theatre.  The community strolls affably and looks itself over.  The girls and the young men, from fifteen to twenty-two, display their charm to one another with lively sociability. The more grace they show the better the community likes them. In Florence or in Naples, in the ancient city slums the young people are virtuoso performers and they do a bit of promenading anytime they are not busy.”  Of young Romans, he wrote, “Their stroll is as responsive as if it were a physical conversation.”

 

      Solnit’s quote from:  “In ancient Italian town the narrow main street”: Edwin Denby, Dancers, Buildings and People in the Streets, introduction by Frank O’Hara (New York: Horizon Press, 1965), 183.

 

Photo Source:   https://www.google.com/search?q=florence+passeggiata+images&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=iwQFU6LrMpCFogSF84LAAw&ved=0CCQQsAQ&biw=1366&bih=566

A Pedestrian Plaza in New York City

Image

In Brooklyn, the No. 3 subway line ends at New Lots Avenue, where passengers descend from the elevated tracks to what used to be a nasty intersection, trafficked by prostitutes, drug dealers — “You name it,” as Eddie Di Benedetto, the owner of Caterina’s Pizzeria, put it the other day.

Not long ago, a coalition of local merchants and community leaders turned to the New York City Department of Transportation, which runs a program to make traffic circles, triangles and streets into pedestrian plazas. The department brought in some potted trees and chairs, closed off a short street and voilà, what had been a problem became a boon. Since the plaza opened last summer, crime has plummeted, Mr. Di Benedetto told me, crediting the local police precinct. He heads the New Lots Avenue Triangle Merchants Association.

“People use the place all the time now, meaning the area is watched and safe,” he said. “I’ve had my pizzeria since 1971, so I can tell you, this is a renaissance.”  

 

From: “A Street Corner Serenade for the Public Plaza” by Michael Kimmelman, New York Times, June 2, 2013.

Read more:   http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/02/arts/design/a-prescription-for-plazas-and-public-spaces.html?_r=0