Tracking Canadian Political Metaphors

metaphor canada oil sands footprint

“Foot in mouth? Trudeau vows more ‘discipline’ over off-the-cuff remarks (with video)”

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/politics/foot-in-mouth-trudeau-vows-more-discipline-over-off-the-cuff-remarks-with-video

“Holding politicians’ feet to the fire.”

http://publications.mcgill.ca/mcgillnews/2013/04/04/holding-politicians-feet-to-the-fire/

“John Tory’s long road to victory kept his campaign team on its toes.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toronto/john-torys-long-road-to-victory-kept-his-campaign-team-on-its-toes/article21417871/?page=all#dashboard/follows/

“Our duty is to stand firm in the face of Russian aggression.” (article by Prime Minister Stephen Harper)

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/our-duty-is-to-stand-firm-in-the-face-of-russian-aggression/article19767742/#dashboard/follows/

“There Are Many Footprints in the Oil Sands.”

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/06/17/idUKnMKWwJWxwa+1d8+MKW20140617

Photo Source:

http://worklabournewsresearch.tumblr.com/post/101788095656/the-globe-and-mails-report-on-business-magazine

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Do Kids Walk to School in Canada?

walking to school stats in canada

Canadian parents, by and large, walked to school when they were kids.  Not so much for their own children. Fewer kids these days walk or bike to school. Active Healthy Kids Canada, in their recent ‘report card’, gives Canadian kids a D- on this physical activity.

While 58% of parents walked to school when they were children, only 28% of their own kids were doing the same today. “That’s a reduction of 50% in one generation,” said Dr. Mark Tremblay, chief scientific officer of Active Healthy Kids Canada.  “High numbers of kids are being ferried to destinations within walking or biking distance.”

How to reverse this trend?  Kelly Murumets of ParticipAction says parents need to get involved. Kids who are able to travel on foot or use pedal power can travel in groups with volunteer adults. “Kids are getting physical activity, they have social time, they’re with other kids, they’re safe because they’re supervised, (and) some of the parents who do work are able to make their way to the office,” Murumets said.

If kids walked for all trips less than one kilometer in distance, it would translate, on average, to 2,238 additional steps each day – or around 15 to 20 minutes of walking, Active Healthy Kids Canada noted.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/kids-get-d–on-physical-activity-report-card-as-fewer-walk-or-bike-to-school/article12049548/

Source of Chart:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/parenting/back-to-school/back-to-school-anxiety-what-do-parents-and-kids-worry-about/article20292673/#dashboard/follows/

Re-enforcing Ability: Canadian Paralympians

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The caption on this advertisement reads:  “She doesn’t want your sympathy. But her opponents might.”

(Canadian Paralympic Committee / Comité paralympique canadien)

This picture of Stephanie Dixon appeared in the Globe and Mail newspaper on March 5, 2011. She is one of Canada’s most successful Paralympic swimmers ever. Born with one leg, Dixon often trained with and competed against able-bodied athletes. She began swimming at age two and by age 14 was already on Canada’s Paralympic team.

Stephanie Dixon has many accomplishments: 

  • Setting numerous world records.
  • Winning 19 medals, the second most by a Canadian.
  • Setting a Canadian record with five gold medals, at her first Paralympics, at age 16 in Sydney.
  • Earning a university degree in psychology.
  • Coaching swimming.
  • Travelling as an ambassador for the Canadian Paralympic Association.
  • Being inducted into the Canadian Disability Hall of Fame.
  • Mentoring up-and-coming athletes with “CIBC Team Next”
  • Training with Canada’s national cross-country relay ski team in Whitehorse.

 

Excerpts from: http://www.bramptonguardian.com/sports-story/4248578-from-swimming-to-skiing-brampton-paralympian-takes-on-yet-another-challenge/

Photo Source: http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=A0LEVwuYr4dTrk8AayNXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTB0MWoxNW52BHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2JmMQR2dGlkA1NNRTM5OV8x?_adv_prop=image&fr=mcafee&va=canadian+paralympic+committee+photo+swimmer

Recognizing Ability: A Foot Artist

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Daniel Laflamme grabs a water bottle with his foot and bends over to take a sip. Then he adroitly places a paintbrush between his toes and begins to paint.  Deaf and mute, Laflamme, who has cerebral palsy, communicates through his painting. 

In 2006, the Quebec City artist was in Toronto to help publicize an exhibition by Canada’s Mouth and Foot Painting Artists.  The organization sells replicas of the painters’ works on greeting cards and calendars to help the artists live independent lives.

At the organization’s headquarters on St. Clair Avenue West, Laflamme showed off his prowess as an artist. Bent over like a pretzel on the floor, he painted with authority and skill as he worked on a still life of flowers and a fruit bowl.

Then he stopped to get more paint. He used one foot to bring the palette of paints closer to him.  Holding his paintbrush between his toes, he dipped his brush in the paint and then began once more to delicately apply color to his masterpiece.

 

Quoting: Debra Black, Toronto Star, July 7, 2006

Photo by: Rick Eglinton, Toronto Star, July 7, 2006. Photo Source: http://thestar.blogs.com/photoblog/2012/05/yonge-and-eglinton-no-longer-intersect.html

Overcoming Fear before Walking in Space

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As a young Canadian boy, Chris Hadfield had dreamt of becoming an astronaut and walking in space. Before realizing this goal, he had to confront his very real fear of danger. Now a retired astronaut, Chris Hadfield reminisces about his experience:

“I was outside on my first spacewalk when suddenly my left eye slammed shut and was in great pain – some substance had leaked into it, and it had gone blind. I thought, ‘Well, maybe that’s why we have two eyes.’ So I kept working, but unfortunately without gravity, tears don’t fall. You just get a bigger and bigger ball of whatever got into your eye mixed with your tears until the surface tension takes it across the bridge of your nose like a tiny waterfall into your other eye. Now I was completely blind outside the spaceship.”

Using a bizarre ‘walking’ strategy, Hadfield had trained for this face-to-face encounter with danger. He offered details at the TED Conference in Vancouver.  Check the link below for his recommended training on how to overcome fear. 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/ideas-lab/an-astronauts-way-with-danger-how-chris-hadfield-overcomes-fear/article17568316/

Photo Source:

http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=A0LEVzb3oINTSToAVgtXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTB0MWoxNW52BHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2JmMQR2dGlkA1NNRTM5OV8x?_adv_prop=image&fr=mcafee&sz=all&va=chris+hadfield+walking+space

Team Feet in the Air

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Canadian basketball team jump for joy in front of the Olympic rings inside the London 2012 Olympic Village in Stratford, east London. July 24, 2012.

 

Shopped original photo by: AP Photo/Suzanne Plunkett, Pool

 http://onomeister.wordpress.com/2012/07/29/onomeisters-olympics-photo-of-the-day-go-canadian-womens-basketball/

Wallenda Walks the Wire across Niagara Falls

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On June 15, 2012, in elk-suede-soled slippers Nik Wallenda hopped onto a tightrope that stretched over Niagara Falls from the US to Canada. With his father’s encouraging voice in his ear, he balanced himself with a 30-foot pole and praised Jesus Christ with each tiptoed step.

The 33-year-old Wallenda follows in the footsteps of a funambulist family. In the last seven generations, several have perished during their daring acts. In this tradition that continually raises the stakes, he became the first person to walk directly over the falls.

He began like a ballerina with cautiously pointed footwork. It was a spectacular promenade over 1,800 feet of wire. Near the end, he threw caution to the wind and raced to the open arms of his waiting family. The Canadian authorities (gleefully) stamped his American passport. Nik Wallenda declared that he hadn’t brought anything with him, apart from his passport and a balancing pole.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/nik-wallenda-completes-niagara-falls-wire-walk-1.1179900

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/17/nyregion/nik-wallenda-tightrope-walking-his-way-into-the-history-books.html?_r=0

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/nik-wallenda-the-age-of-derring-do-is-far-from-over/article4244137/?page=all