PAN AM Bowling Footwork

pan am bowling    While ‘Walking the Line’ in bowling is not a sobriety test, the two are comparable. Participants in both activities take each step as carefully and as naturally as possible. Just as one might tend to drift, so might the other. Holding, swinging and delivering a bowling ball to hit the target of ten pins down a narrow lane would put any normal gait off-balance. (Not to mention the awkwardness of angling for a ‘spare’.) To achieve or retrieve that balance, bowlers train by walking consistent lines at the same pace with every shot. This consistency ensures that their pendulum arm swing and release of the ball is controlled and accurate.

Steps in the approach: The number is determined by the bowler’s height and type of swing.  Typically, there are four or five steps from the initial stance of parallel feet to the final glide at the foul line. Each step is centered to the body. One foot overlaps (at a height of no more than two inches) in front of the other, not unlike a tightrope acrobat.

The first step:  Like a short walking step, the foot moves from heel to toe and assumes the weight of the body.

The second step:  The ball is placed into swing with the movement of this key short step. The bowler controls and begins to place the ball.

The third step:  Taken heel-toe with a longer stride.  Momentum builds.

The fourth step: Maintaining heel-toe approach with a slightly longer stride and increased momentum.

The fifth step:  Similar to length of fourth step.  Foot begins to slide, finishing up by pointing somewhat to the target, remaining there for several seconds until fully balanced.

Some bowlers use a toe-first power step on their penultimate move, giving a strong push off to the final glide. Each bowler finds her own successful, consistent stride. Without looking, you would recognize a bowler for the repetitive cadence or beat of her footsteps.

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/bowling

http://wserver.flc.losrios.edu/~willson/pact320/handouts/footwork.html

http://www.bowlingball.com/BowlVersity/how-to-walk-your-bowling-footwork-lines

http://webpages.charter.net/bowlfit/articles/ba.pdf

http://www.missiletc.com/monthly_bowling_tips.htm

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

Raised Footprints in the Snow

footprints in the snow raised

This photograph shows a trail of footprints across Antarctica. The person who made them is long gone.

Raised footprints take weeks to form. They are the product of a very specific environment. The snow has to be loose and dry, so that the foot can sink in and compress the snow until it’s hard. Since snowfall and rain can spoil the print, the weather has to be dry. And there has to be constant wind. As someone walks, their feet tamp down the snow until it’s extremely hard in comparison to the snow all around it.

As the wind sweeps across the area, it whisks away loose particles of snow. It takes considerably longer to whisk away the compressed snow of the footprints. Eventually, the wind wears down an entire plain, or side of a hill, except for the hardened tracks in the snow.

http://io9.com/raised-footprints-when-snow-steps-up-473092187

Debussy’s Footsteps in the Snow

footprints in the snow debussy

Composer Claude Debussy was not a natural at the piano. At first, he struggled to learn to love the instrument. But as he continued to write piano music, Debussy started trying new things, new sounds. He seemed to want to take the piano to places it had never been before.

Debussy’s prelude, Footsteps in the Snow, with its quiet, snowbound character was radical when it appeared in 1910.  The composer inscribed these instructions on the manuscript: “This rhythm must have the sonorous value of a landscape sad and frozen.”

“We tend to think of radical obsession as something loud, like Beethoven,” Commentator Rob Kapilow tells Performance Today host Fred Child, “But you can be radically obsessed in a quiet landscape, as well…. This piece is a study of two footsteps — left and right. And the amazing thing is what’s going to happen with that. In just these two tiny footsteps, Debussy manages to hear a complete universe.”

Trudging through the snowy landscape, the listener hears Debussy’s repeated alternating chords — left foot, right foot. It almost seems too simple.

http://www.npr.org/2009/02/18/100814333/debussy-a-world-revealed-in-two-footsteps

Check out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ8qhfS5o10

Photo Source:  https://www.google.ca/search?q=Debussy%E2%80%99s+Footsteps+in+the+Snow+image&sa=X&biw=1366&bih=667&nfpr=1&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ei=MAF-VJGVLNWhyASC6IGoBQ&ved=0CB4QsAQ

Biometric Soles

Gait identifying

Pedo-Biometrics Lab (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh) is working on high-tech shoe insoles designed to monitor access to high-security areas such as military bases or nuclear power plants. The concept for these insoles builds on extensive research that shows individuals have unique feet and ways of walking.

Sensors in the biometric soles check the pressure of feet and monitor gait. Its microcomputer compares these patterns with a master file for that person. By the third step, it can determine the match or not. If not, a wireless alarm triggers a message. The sensor also detects when someone is wearing another person’s shoes.

Scientists have known for centuries that each person has a unique way of walking. The U.S. Department of Defense and the Chinese government pour millions into funding gait research. The Institute of Intelligent Machines is also doing extensive research into gait biometrics. There are even reports of floors designed to monitor footsteps without people being aware of it.

For more details, including how biometric soles may be used for medical diagnostics, check this link:

http://www.mobilenapps.com/articles/3243/20120723/biometric-soles-future-high-tech-security.htm

Photo Source:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=app+to+identify+gait+marios+savvides+images&biw=1366&bih=667&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=xFVNVIzEFcqBygSi44GYCg&ved=0CBwQsAQ

Announcing the First Footstep on the Moon

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 “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

July 20, 1969: Neil Armstrong became the first man to step foot on the moon. He and his co-pilot, Col. Buzz Aldrin planted an American flag on the lunar surface and a plaque which reads, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon. July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.”

 

Sources:

http://www.cartridgesave.co.uk/news/15-of-the-most-iconic-newspaper-headlines-ever-printed/

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/apollo11_40th.html

Green Pedestrian Crossings in Shanghai

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Pedestrians walk into a crosswalk and plant green leaves with every footstep.  A campaign by DDB China Group uses street art to promote walking.  While there is no guarantee that awareness will shift in a country that now boasts 500 million cars; it is an advocacy movement taking one step at a time. 

“We decided to leverage a busy pedestrian crossing; a place where both pedestrians and drivers meet. We lay a giant canvas of 12.6 meters long by 7 meters wide on the ground, covering the pedestrian crossing with a large leafless tree. Placed on either side of the road beneath the traffic lights, were sponge cushions soaked in green environmentally friendly washable and quick dry paint. As pedestrians walked towards the crossing, they would step onto the green sponge and as they walked, the soles of their feet would make foot imprints onto the tree on the ground. Each green footprint added to the canvas like leaves growing on a bare tree, which made people feel that by walking they could create a greener environment.”

After an initial deployment on seven Shanghai streets, the award-winning Crossing was later expanded to 132 roads in 15 Chinese cities. DDB estimates that 3.9 million people participated. Predictably, it blew up across Chinese media channels, and was even featured in the Shanghai Zheng Da Art Museum.

 

http://www.fastcoexist.com/1680511/amazing-interactive-street-art-turns-pedestrian-footsteps-into-the-leaves-of-trees

Walking Emotion Out

 

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“An Eskimo [Inuit] custom offers an angry person release by walking the emotion out of his or her system in a straight line across the landscape; the point at which the anger is conquered is marked with a stick, bearing witness to the strength or length of the rage.” 

― Lucy R. Lippard, Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory

 

http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/949212-an-eskimo-custom-offers-an-angry-person-release-by-walking

 Picture Source:   http://www.economist.com/node/21556805