PAN AM Taekwondo Footwork

pan am taekwondo          In Taekwondo, kicking is the most important technique. They are prolific in variety and can defeat an opponent in a single strike.  Kicks to the head score the most points.  After the ritual bow, the combatant moves into his initial stance. From that position, he launches into an arsenal of forceful footwork. This martial artist can rapidly shift his weight, alternating legs performing in quick succession: a Spin Kick, a Straight Kick, a Jump Kick, a Jump Spin Kick, Double and Triple Kicks.  Apparently, there are even fake kicks.

The foot is at its height of combative power in these knock-out moves.  Depending on which kick he executes, the fighter uses various parts of his foot.

The Heel is used in the penetrating Side Kick. Its relative toughness is also suited to landing a punishing KO on the opponent’s head with the Axe Kick or the Hook Kick.

The Ball of the Foot, the area directly underneath the toes, is exposed when they are pulled back. This area is engaged in Frontal, Snapping Kicks and aimed at the opponent’s solar plexus, stomach or chin. The toes must be pulled back in Front Snapping Kicks or they could be broken on impact.

The Instep, at the top of the foot, is exposed when the toes are pointed forward.  It is a useful surface for kicking the side of an opponent’s body or head. Turning Kicks or Roundhouses engage the instep.

The Edge of the foot is prepared for striking by turning the foot down so the sole lies horizontal to the leg. The outside edge can then be used as a striking surface in Side Kicks much like the heel. Due to the small surface area of the edge of the foot, a more painful kick can be inflicted with this slightly more advanced technique. The edge of the foot is often used to snap boards in displays of Taekwondo breaking.

The Sole of the foot provides a big surface area and is mostly used in Taekwondo to force the opponent backwards. In this way, Pushing Kicks are more of a defensive maneuver. Nevertheless, a well-timed pushing kick can knock the wind out of an attacker.

The Knee is banned for use in Taekwondo competitions for good reason. The knee is a formidable weapon and can knock an opponent out in a single, low-risk strike. Knee techniques may be taught in Taekwondo as part of self-defense. (1)

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/taekwondo

http://www.taekwondoanimals.com/taekwondo-kicks

http://www.ir.isas.jaxa.jp/~cpp/TKD/technique/stances-e.html

http://www.talktaekwondo.co.uk/guides/taekwondo_standing_kicks.html (1)

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

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PAN AM Rugby Sevens Footwork

pan am rugby sevens         Seven to each team, rugby players pass the ball backwards or kick the ball forwards towards their opponents’ goal area. Rugby is a multi-directional, full-contact sport. Footwork is aggressive, evasive and varied as they – for example – lift the jumper in a line out, hook the ball with their feet during a scrum, and free the ball with their feet during a ruck. The players hone their skills of acceleration – to move into open spaces when they have ball possession, agility – to move laterally, backwards or forwards to follow the ball, and balance – to withstand a tackle.

Agile Footwork – Swerving and Side Stepping

A ball carrier will swerve to avoid being tackled. He moves right up to the defender, both hands holding the ball in front.  He swerves to the right (or left, with opposite scenario) using the outside of his left boot and the inside of his right boot.  Moving the ball to his right hand away from the defender, he sprints into available space.

The side step, on the other hand, is an instantaneous change of direction by a ball carrier on the run from a defender.  Keeping the ball in both hands, he chooses a new direction, shortens his stride, steps wide with his outside leg, shifting his weight there. Looking like he is going to take off from that angle, he quickly shifts his weight to his other leg, pushing off with his outside leg.  While the defender is off balance, the ball carrier accelerates out of reach.

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/rugby-sevens

http://www.irbpassport.com/?page=beginners&p=21

http://www.rugby.com.au/Portals/18/Files/Coaching/Level3Papers/S.Hedger_-_Fast_Feet_Lvl_3.pdf

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/rugby_league/skills/4217044.stm

http://www.teachpe.com/rugby/techniques/sidestep.php

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN AM Handball Footwork

pan am handball          The referees keep their eyes on the handball players’ feet. They look for violations of the rules. For example, the ball must not touch below the player’s knee and certainly, kicking is not permitted. Players are restricted to three steps while holding the ball. If they exceed that limit, the referees card them. Handball players organize their movements to receive the ball on the left foot in front move. Then on their final of three steps, they have optimal take-off energy to pass or take a shot on goal. It is a “left, right, left” or “fake, drive, jump” pattern.

Watchful offside betters focus on the goalkeepers.   This is a high-scoring game, for example: 28 to 23, 38 to 33, and 35 to 32. With all the fast-moving offensive action, goalkeepers are on their toes for the entire game. They are busy but not bustling. Their moves are slow compared to their team mates.  But when the ball arrives it is a good bet that they spring into action.

Goalkeeper’s Footwork

Balance and instant reactions are important. Goalkeepers start and return to ready position with feet shoulder-width apart, weight on the balls of the feet and knees slightly bent. They move side to side in small even steps following the ball, reducing angles when an attacker advances. Feet spring with hands up and out to save high shots on goal, feet slide and go wide for low saves. Two informally-named footwork styles in response to low shots:

  1. The Yugoslavian style:

The goalkeeper takes a deep side step with his whole leg and same side hand movement. Body weight transfers to that leg and its foot is ‘open’; the inside of the foot is ready to stop the ball.

  1. The Scandinavian style

Sliding on the heel of the leg closest to the approaching shot on goal, the goalkeeper extends one or both hands towards the foot of that leg.

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/handball

http://mnteamhandball.blogspot.ca/2009/08/few-words-regarding-footwork.html

http://livesports-betting.com/are-you-a-handball-passionate/

http://www.wikihow.com/Play-Handball

http://teamhandball.ab.ca/clientuploads/goalkeeper-First+Step.pdf

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-handball-goalkeeping

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

      TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN AM Football (Soccer) Footwork

pan am football aka soccer      Whether dribbling, passing or shooting the ball, football players must think on their feet.  On the field, they keep the ball moving and aim to put it past the goalie into the net. To accomplish this simple thing, players also play a complex thinking game. The ball needs to be moved by foot and must arrive at the right person’s feet without letting any other fast-moving feet intervene. All parts of the foot can be used during the game.  Whether for controlling the ball or kicking it from various angles, Football is truly an “Inside-Outside-Top-Heel-Bottom-of–the-Foot Game”

Of all the football skills, kicking the ball powerfully is apparently the most difficult. It can be an offensive shot on goal or a defensive clearance. It entails a big windup and a big follow through.

Key Pointers for a Kick

Relax.  Allow your entire body to go limp. Shake it out. Let your head, neck legs and every part of your body relax.  The only part of your body that will have tension is your ankle.

Large last stride / loading.  Make your last stride a long “forward hopping” load. Your heel should come close to your behind.  Allow your knee to come through first.  This is known as “storing the load”. Your lower leg will form a V shape. Keep that V shape as long as possible and at the last minute let it extent in a WHIPPING motion through the ball.

Kick with the big toe knuckle.  Approach the ball from a slight angle. The largest bone in your foot is the first metatarsal which is just above the big toe knuckle. This translates into FORCE or energy at impact.

“Break the pane”.   Pretend that the ball is sitting in front of a large pane of glass. You want to break the pane with your body, not just your leg or foot. This means that your forward momentum should continue through the shot. This will also cause you to land on your SHOOTING foot, not your plant foot.

Watch your foot contact the ball.  If you can see your foot strike the ball you are kicking properly. Doing this also keeps your body in a slightly “bent over” position.  Straightening up will kill some of the power release. (1)

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/football-soccer

http://www.socceru.com/kicking_soccer_ball_with_power.htm (1)

http://www.soccer-training-methods.com/kicking-a-soccer-ball.html

http://www.soccer-training-info.com/soccer_strategy_tactics.asp

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN Am Aquatics Swimming (Open Water) Footwork

pan am aquatics open water swimming    Onshore, we see… waves lapping, freestyle arms pulling the swimmers ahead, 3K…4K…5K…back-and-forth…surge and slow…lead, draft, fall-back, one swimmer sprinting ahead of the pack with a strong kick to get to clear water, round the buoys smoothly, a sudden herd of swimmers at the lead swimmers’ feet, trying not to touch them…10K of open water swimming… a marathon.

Sprint Flutter Kick

This fast, up-and-down motion alternates feet. Toes pointed, feet stay submerged, rotating as the body rotates. Feet stay in the narrow path that the head and shoulders have cut through the water. This kick uses a lot of energy so it is best saved for the last part of the open water swim.

Distance Crossover Kick

This slower, less taxing kick is helpful for long events. Swimmers cross their ankles with each (or every other) kick.  The crossover kick is used less for propulsion and more for keeping swimmers in their rhythm and afloat.

Drafting

Etiquette dictates that free riders have to stay back a few inches and not irritate the lead swimmer’s feet. If a competitor keeps touching his feet, the lead swimmer’s gives a few extreme kicks. The competitor gets the message.

Go to PAN AM Schedule – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/open-water-swimming

http://www.enjoy-swimming.com/learn-to-swim.html

http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/a4770731-8cca-49cc-8551-87bfabebf385/CQ%20Open%20Water%20Issue.pdf

http://www.xtri.com/swim-tech/detail/284-itemId.511711564.html

 

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN Am Aquatics Swimming (In Pool) Footwork

pan am swimming in pool    Watching the Pan Am pool’s underwater cameras may be the optimal way to appreciate the depth and variety of footwork in swimming. Subtle, swift moves by both hands and feet propel swimmers along their lanes.

Footwork accompanying various swimming strokes: 

Backstroke: The ‘flutter kick’ entails kicking up and down with alternating legs. The kicking motion originates in the hips. Feet point away from the body.

Breaststroke: ‘Whip kick’ footwork has distinct phases: Initially, a glide of extended legs, close together and toes pointed. Then, knees and feet flex and move towards buttocks, pushing against the water. Next, knees part and feet rotate outwards. Then, legs sweep backwards and outwards, pushing against the water with the inside of feet and lower legs. Legs extend backwards but sweep inwards while feet rotate inward. Legs are now pressed together; feet are nearly in contact. Ready to glide and toes pointed, the new stroke cycle begins.

Butterfly: The swimmer’s legs do a simultaneous whipping motion with feet pointed called a ‘dolphin kick’.  As lower legs moves upward, feet are relaxed under pressure from the water. Alternating, the legs are extended and the feet are pointed during a downward motion creating more propulsion. For a short time, the top of the feet face backwards.

Freestyle (Front Crawl): The simple ‘flutter kick’ continues rhythmically during the whole stroke cycle providing propulsion and stability.

And then there’s the Flip Turn: Swimmers perform an underwater roll at the end of their lap and use their feet to push off from the wall.

Go to….Pan Am Schedule –  http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/swimming

http://www.enjoy-swimming.com/learn-to-swim.html

http://www.swimclub.com.au/resources/articles/swimmers/swimming_at_olympics.html

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM