PAN AM Rhythmic Gymnastics Footwork

pan am gymnastics rhythmic        Three panels of judges scrutinize every move in Rhythmic Gymnastics.  They assess:

  • the technical difficulty of jumps/leaps, pivots, balances or ways the gymnast demonstrates flexibility,
  • the artistic value of the music and apparatus in relation to continuous movement, and
  • how clear and precise the execution of movement is while holding or catching her hoop, ball, clubs and ribbons.

Needless to say, all eyes are on the gymnasts’ feet. Judges deduct points for incomplete moves, heavy landings, wobbly balances, non-defined shapes of the body, or lack of amplitude and/or elevation in a jump, or loss of rhythm with the music. The body must be aligned, with toes pointed and knees straight. (1)

The Importance of Footwork

A research team has proven that ‘feet performance quality’ is significant among the skills in Rhythmic Gymnastics and that it has influence on gymnasts’ success in competitions.

The key-points of the female gymnasts’ feet performance quality are:

  • the height of rising to half toe position;
  • the capacity to perform for a long time on one foot and maintain its turnout and the height of half toe position;
  • the capacity to balance for a long time in high turnout half toe position;
  • the degree of toe pointing;
  • the turnout of feet. (2)

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/gymnastics-rhythmic

http://www.rgalberta.com/bulletins/How%20Rhythmic%20Gymnastics%20is%20Judged.pdf (1)

www.fsp.uni-lj.si/mma_bin.php?id=2013102813085 (2)

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

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PAN AM Cycling – Road Footwork

cycling road      Road cyclists are avid, even over-the-top enthusiasts for their sport.  Nose to tail, they seem to ride in packs. Drafting is all part of the competition. They move through air turbulence together, sharing the benefits.

Roadies have a handle on what is happening technically and biomechanically as they pedal their bikes. They know how to increase energy and efficiency by engaging new muscles and ‘spreading the load’.  They purposefully ride vortices in wakes.  Based on the cadence (RPM), they adjust to high- or low-heel pedaling techniques. They demonstrate how effort in pedaling combined with gravity affects acceleration and deceleration. As experienced bicyclists, they can transfer power and avoid ‘the dead spot’. They’ve revived talk of ‘ankling’, an old technique. It entails “drawing force across the bottom of the revolution arc and upwards to the start of the downward thrust”. (1)  Roadies’ ‘talking the walk/ride’ feeds their own enthusiasm.

However, coaches offering advice to pro-racers on road bikes will often set aside the advanced level talk in favour of simple visual cues:

On the upwards stroke:

  • “As the foot nears the top, think about pushing your knee toward the handlebar”.

On the downwards stroke:

  • “Pretend you’re scraping mud off the sole of your shoe”.

These cues are ‘activated’ well in advance of when the foot is actually at the top or bottom of the pedaling action. (2)  The roadies are on it!

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/cycling-road

http://cyclingtips.com.au/2009/05/efficiency-of-pedal-stroke-ankling/  (1)

http://www.bikesplit.com/bsa4.htm

http://www.brianmac.co.uk/articles/scni45a1.htm

http://www.exploratorium.edu/cycling/aerodynamics2.html

http://www.roadbikerider.com/cycling-science/perfect-pedal-strokes (2)

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM