PAN AM Modern Pentathlon Footwork

pan am modern pentathlon          The pentathlon has always had an intentional military story-line.  The ancient Olympic combination of five sports mirrored their current-day battlefield experiences and techniques. The athletes were soldiers who trained in discus, javelin, long jump, running–in-armour and wrestling. Each sport, with its unique footwork, prepared them in strength and agility for the wars they fought on the ground.  Long ago, the pentathlon winner was celebrated as “the winner of all the games.”

The modern pentathlon – with its five new sports – also has a military tale to tell. A liaison officer was once sent by Napoleon into enemy territory to deliver a message.  This military courier’s horse was shot down; he needed to defend himself with his sword and his pistol. He swam across a raging river and finally – heroically – arrived at his destination by foot.  The disciplines of horsemanship, fencing, shooting, swimming and running reflect this reconstructed battle. Rife with symbolism, the pentathlon embodies pursuit and escape, facing and defying danger.  The significance of ‘feet crossing the finish line to deliver the message’ does just that.

Footnote:  The requirements of war continue to change; the cavalry now rides in tanks. Sport no longer plays a key role in training. Nor do battle experiences inspire combinations of sports for competition.  And yet, the pentathlon models and inspires the modern-day military.  Idealism in soldiering has been revived. The pentathlon’s inherent demands of courage, co-ordination, physical fitness, self-discipline and flexibility in ever-changing circumstances frame a mindset for military leadership training on contemporary battlefields. (1)

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/modern-pentathlon

http://www.northyorkshiresport.co.uk/get-into-sport/sports/equestrian

http://www.champs21.com/pentathlon:-the-olympic-event-of-five-sports-1127

http://usacac.army.mil/sites/default/files/documents/lde/DCL/dcl_Second_Place_Essay_2006_2007.pdf (1)

www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA468972

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN AM Kayaking Footwork

pan am canoe kayak slalom      Apparently, kayaking is like riding a bike – once you find the balance, you have it forever. This comparison may not work for mistakes en route. An ‘Eskimo Roll’ is an altogether different recovery after capsizing in a kayak compared to falling off a bike and getting back on.

On ‘flatwater’ or in ‘whitewater’, kayakers sit in a cockpit – the kayak’s only opening.  Their legs are stretched out and their feet are stabilized on foot pedals or braces at the front of the kayak.  Kayakers use a double-bladed paddle on both sides of these narrow, light-weight boats. A rudder is under the hull to steer the kayak. The kayaker’s feet control the rudder.

“Push Feet and Paddle for Power”

A good kayak stroke starts at the feet. Feet ignite the power for forward movement. The ball of the foot on the stroke-side pushes firmly against the foot pedal, straightening that leg. The rudder responds by steering in that direction.  The paddler uncoils his torso and spears the water with his blade. Then the next side, alternating. The body of a kayaker is like an engine, driving off the foot pedal, legs pushing and pulling to generate power with the stroke.

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/canoe-kayak-sprint

http://www.toronto2015.org/canoe-kayak-slalom

http://canoekayak.ca/go-paddling/sprint/

http://www.kayakpaddling.net/2-2

http://www.sherrikayaks.com/2011/06/01/use-your-legs-to-improve-your-forward-stroke/

http://www.useakayak.org/strokes/paddling_engine.html

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

   TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN AM Bowling Footwork

pan am bowling    While ‘Walking the Line’ in bowling is not a sobriety test, the two are comparable. Participants in both activities take each step as carefully and as naturally as possible. Just as one might tend to drift, so might the other. Holding, swinging and delivering a bowling ball to hit the target of ten pins down a narrow lane would put any normal gait off-balance. (Not to mention the awkwardness of angling for a ‘spare’.) To achieve or retrieve that balance, bowlers train by walking consistent lines at the same pace with every shot. This consistency ensures that their pendulum arm swing and release of the ball is controlled and accurate.

Steps in the approach: The number is determined by the bowler’s height and type of swing.  Typically, there are four or five steps from the initial stance of parallel feet to the final glide at the foul line. Each step is centered to the body. One foot overlaps (at a height of no more than two inches) in front of the other, not unlike a tightrope acrobat.

The first step:  Like a short walking step, the foot moves from heel to toe and assumes the weight of the body.

The second step:  The ball is placed into swing with the movement of this key short step. The bowler controls and begins to place the ball.

The third step:  Taken heel-toe with a longer stride.  Momentum builds.

The fourth step: Maintaining heel-toe approach with a slightly longer stride and increased momentum.

The fifth step:  Similar to length of fourth step.  Foot begins to slide, finishing up by pointing somewhat to the target, remaining there for several seconds until fully balanced.

Some bowlers use a toe-first power step on their penultimate move, giving a strong push off to the final glide. Each bowler finds her own successful, consistent stride. Without looking, you would recognize a bowler for the repetitive cadence or beat of her footsteps.

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/bowling

http://wserver.flc.losrios.edu/~willson/pact320/handouts/footwork.html

http://www.bowlingball.com/BowlVersity/how-to-walk-your-bowling-footwork-lines

http://webpages.charter.net/bowlfit/articles/ba.pdf

http://www.missiletc.com/monthly_bowling_tips.htm

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN AM Athletics – Track and Field Footwork

pan am athletics     A 200 meter foot race called ‘stadion’ was the only event for the first thirteen Olympics more than 2700 years ago. The runners were barefoot (in fact, nude) and they started in a standing position.  The most grueling competition, in those days, was the foot race in full battle armour.  Longer distance running entered the arena of competition in and after the 14th Olympics.

Fast-forward to 2015, track and field athletics are prolific in variety….running short and long distances, jumping high and long, plus several oddball throwing events. There are even combinations of up to ten events performed by one athlete.  Changes overtime are a testimony to athletes’ increasing agility, strength and endurance, not to mention the watching world’s wider arena.

 

Focus: The Footwork of Race Walking

This most unusual of foot races is deceptively difficult. It is called ‘heel and toe’ walking; the heel of the front foot and the toe of the rear foot appear to be in contact with the ground at the same time.  Staying ‘grounded’ is a rule; one foot must be in contact with the ground at all times.  The other rule is that the knee of the leading leg must be straight when the heel strikes the ground until that leg passes under the body. Race walkers speed up and lengthen their strides by swiveling and tilting their hips.

Race Walking judges, positioned around the track, watch for infractions and enforce the rules with yellow and red cards.  As they rely on eye sight alone, there have been calls for technical assistance in judging. A ‘shoe alarm’, triggered when a race walker’s feet were off the ground for more than 30 or 40 milliseconds, was a passing idea.

Go to  – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/athletics

http://www.nba.com/cavaliers/news/ancient_games_funfacts.html

http://www.topendsports.com/events/summer/ancient-events.htm

http://www.centurions1911.org.uk/race-walking-rules.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/11/sports/olympics/olympic-racewalking-is-more-complicated-than-it-seems.html?_r=0

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

   TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM