Overcoming Fear before Walking in Space

Image

As a young Canadian boy, Chris Hadfield had dreamt of becoming an astronaut and walking in space. Before realizing this goal, he had to confront his very real fear of danger. Now a retired astronaut, Chris Hadfield reminisces about his experience:

“I was outside on my first spacewalk when suddenly my left eye slammed shut and was in great pain – some substance had leaked into it, and it had gone blind. I thought, ‘Well, maybe that’s why we have two eyes.’ So I kept working, but unfortunately without gravity, tears don’t fall. You just get a bigger and bigger ball of whatever got into your eye mixed with your tears until the surface tension takes it across the bridge of your nose like a tiny waterfall into your other eye. Now I was completely blind outside the spaceship.”

Using a bizarre ‘walking’ strategy, Hadfield had trained for this face-to-face encounter with danger. He offered details at the TED Conference in Vancouver.  Check the link below for his recommended training on how to overcome fear. 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/ideas-lab/an-astronauts-way-with-danger-how-chris-hadfield-overcomes-fear/article17568316/

Photo Source:

http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=A0LEVzb3oINTSToAVgtXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTB0MWoxNW52BHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2JmMQR2dGlkA1NNRTM5OV8x?_adv_prop=image&fr=mcafee&sz=all&va=chris+hadfield+walking+space

Deep Travelling on Foot

Image

To walk in the world’s poorer countries is to enter the orbit of their inhabitants. An attachment to the earth—to the vital soil or rock underfoot—is still the lot of most of the world’s population.

Colin Thubron has walked most happily in small countries—Cyprus, Lebanon, Kyrgystan—where the regional changes are close and intimate. The footpaths and goat-tracks thread a network of sites—villages, fields, wells—whose genesis belongs to a time before tarmac. Sometimes they give you the pleasing sense of walking through the ancient character of the land.

Shorn of the steel straitjacket of aeroplane or car, this might be called “deep travelling” if only your feet were less transient on the track.

 

Quoting Colin Thubron  who is an award-winning travel writer and the president of the Royal Society of Literature

http://moreintelligentlife.com/content/ideas/simon-willis/best-way-travel-walking

 

Picture source:  https://www.google.com/search?q=walking+on+rural+path+in+ethiopia&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=OKX6UpTMHJOrqQH-nYG4BA&ved=0CFsQsAQ&biw=1366&bih=566