Terry Fox’s Marathon of Hope

charity Terry Fox

Terry was an 18-year-old first year Kinesiology student at Simon Fraser University and a member of the SFU junior varsity basketball team in 1977 when he was diagnosed with bone cancer that resulted in the amputation of his right leg six inches above the knee. After undergoing chemotherapy and seeing other people, particularly children, suffering with cancer, Terry decided that he wanted to make a difference in the world. He wanted to do something to help cure this dreadful disease.

Terry began his Marathon of Hope on April 12, 1980 in St. John’s, Newfoundland. When he was forced by a recurrence of cancer to stop his cross-Canada run at Thunder Bay, Ontario, on September 1, 1980, he had completed a total of 5,373 km over 143 days, the equivalent of a marathon every day. After a courageous battle with cancer, he passed away in June 1981.

Few people are aware of the physical enormity of what Terry did in his Marathon of Hope run across Canada. He ran 26 miles per day, 7 days per week. Imagine how sore your legs would be if you walked 26 miles, day after day, on pavement. Smiles, day after day. Few people could stand up to such punishment. Then try to imagine how incredibly difficult and painful it would be to run 26 miles per day with an artificial limb. It is almost beyond comprehension.

It was a journey that Canadians will never forget. His courage, determination, humanitarianism, and selflessness have been an inspiration to millions of people.

Quoting: http://www.sfu.ca/terryfox/about.html

See also: http://www.terryfox.org/TerryFox/Facts.html

Photo Source: https://www.google.ca/search?q=terry+fox&biw=1366&bih=624&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=UOOAVOuuH46tyAT-9IHoAg&sqi=2&ved=0CCkQsAQ#imgdii=_

Standing Tall – Spencer West

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Spencer West redefines height – in his spirit, in the way he lives, and in the actions he takes to affect other people’s lives.

Now two-foot-seven, Spencer was born with a spinal defect and legs that didn’t function. He was five when his doctors felt they had no choice but to amputate them. They said he wouldn’t be able to sit up or move around by himself. Spencer defied that prediction by learning to use his arms to move. Prosthetics weren’t for him.

While most people would be hard pressed to use their feet to walk the 300-kilometre distance from Edmonton to Calgary, Spencer West recently made the journey almost entirely on his hands. His purpose was to raise funds and awareness for Me to We /Free The Children’s ‘We Walk 4 Water’ campaign. The donations will provide a permanent source of clean water for 100,000 people around the world.

Spencer West is a favorite motivational speaker at Me to We events. Stories of his feats inspire audiences of school children across Canada. For example, he climbed the 19,341 foot-high Mount Kilimanjaro, raising more than half a million dollars in a similar Me To We campaign. He urges others to go beyond their perceived limitations and to give of themselves.

Check out Spencer’s best-selling autobiography “Standing Tall: My Journey”.  Also, his experiences feature in the documentary “Redefine Possible: The Story of Spencer West” that was shown at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival.

But here is the next best way to learn more:     TOMORROW, JUNE 17, 2014

There will be a LIVE-STREAMING of SPENCER WEST SPEAKING from 10am to 11:30 am EST at: www.freethechildren.com/watch

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/05/06/spencer-west-edmonton-calgary-walk_n_3225627.html#slide=1323331

Photo source:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=spencer+west+image&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=-iufU8y8K4HD8AHpu4HYAg&ved=0CBsQsAQ&biw=1228&bih=589