Keeping Up with American Political Metaphors

Metaphors in pix USA

“Democrats’ Last Stand? Party foothold in Deep South at stake in Landrieu run-off.”

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/11/07/landrieu-faces-run-off-challenges-on-multiple-fronts/

“Deportations Give Migrants Cold Feet.”

http://online.wsj.com/articles/deportations-give-migrants-cold-feet-1406159717

“’Foot-in-Mouth’ Kerry’s Nixonian Blunder.”

http://www.ronpaulinstitute.org/archives/peace-and-prosperity/2014/april/09/foot-in-mouth-kerrys-nixonian-blunder/

“Hagel touts ‘light footprint’ strategy for US military amid Ukraine unrest.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/06/chuck-hagel-us-miliatry-strategy-ukraine-abroad

“Running in the shadow of Obama.”

http://globe2go.newspaperdirect.com/epaper/viewer.aspx

Photo Source:

http://www.economist.com/news/united-states/21611140-president-wants-ceos-play-ball-he-might-have-change-his-own-language-stop

Dragging Your Feet or Cooling Your Heels?

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You probably refer to feet more than you think you do.  When you start paying attention to speech and writing patterns, you find feet – usually fitted out as idioms or expressions – deliver all kinds of messages.

Here are ten expressions that refer to feet or legs.  Check out the meanings. Have you heard or used one of these idioms recently?

1. One’s Achilles’ heel is one’s weakness.

2. To be bound hand and foot is to be literally or figuratively tied up.

3. To bring one to heel is to subdue someone.

4. To go somewhere by or on foot is to walk or hike there.

5. To cool one’s heels is to pause to calm down or think before doing something rash.

6. To dig in one’s heels is to be obstinate.

7. One who doesn’t have a leg to stand on is unsupported by evidence or corroboration.

8. To drag one’s feet is to delay.

9. To find one’s feet is to become accustomed or oriented.

10. To be fleet of foot is to be fast.

 

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/50-idioms-about-legs-feet-and-toes/

Photo Source:

http://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=A0LEV1rG5HBTVWYAtDVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTB0ZDFnMjIwBHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2JmMQR2dGlkA1ZJUDQxOV8x?_adv_prop=image&fr=mcafee&sz=all&va=cooling+your+heels

How Not to Teeter Totter on Heels

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One way to learn how to balance and walk in your high heels is to take a “Stiletto Workout Class”. No guff.  In three-inch heels, you tighten your tummy, do kicks and squats, lift weights and perform ballet moves.  Nicole Demaris started these classes after observing women wobble all over New York City streets.

As the New York Times writer Hilary Howard’s husband balked, “You’re going to a stiletto class? That sounds like a lawsuit waiting to happen.”  But off to this workout class she went, right after she bought her first pair of very high heels! She claims she wasn’t sure what stilettos were, wondering if they were “those spindly things worn by fancy women who disappear rapidly into taxis?”

A stiletto workout?  After her first and last class, Hilary said, “It can be done”.  Check out studios around New York City. (ndgfit.com)

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/28/nyregion/stiletto-workout-invented-by-nicole-damaris.html?_r=0

Calling out to God to Rescue your Feet

Praying from the MESSAGE version of The Book of Psalms: 

God! God! I am running to you for dear life; the chase is wild. If they catch me, I’m finished (7:1, 2). God! Please hurry to my rescue! God, come quickly to my side (70:1). God, give grace, get me up on my feet (41:10). I run for dear life to God, I’ll never live to regret it. Do what you do so well: get me out of this mess and up on my feet (71:1, 2). Make a show of how much you love me so the bullies who hate me will stand there slack-jawed, as you, God, gently and powerfully put me back on my feet (86:17). I’m feeling terrible—I couldn’t feel worse! Get me on my feet again. You promised, remember (119:25)?

I waited and waited and waited for you. At last you looked; finally you listened. You lifted me out of the ditch, pulled me from deep mud. You stood me up on a solid rock to make sure I wouldn’t slip (40:1, 2)?

When I run to you God, you save me (37:40). You did everything you promised, and I’m thanking you with all my heart. You pulled me from the brink of death, my feet from the cliff-edge of doom. Now I stroll at leisure with you in the sunlit fields of life (56:12, 13).

I bless you, God! I give you a thunderous welcome! Didn’t you set me on the road to life? Didn’t you keep me out of the ditch (66:8, 9)? Yes, because You are my refuge, You the High God my very own home, evil can’t get close to me; harm can’t get through the door. You ordered your angels to guard me wherever I go. If I stumble, they’ll catch me; their job is to keep me from falling (91:9–12).

I said to myself, “Relax and rest. God has showered you with blessings. Soul, you’ve been rescued from death; Eye, you’ve been rescued from tears; and you, Foot, were kept from stumbling” (116:7, 8).

God, you make everything come out right; you put victims like me back on my feet (103:6). Blessed be you Lord – day after day you carry me along (68:19). Thank you for your love, thank you for your faithfulness; most holy is your name, most holy is your Word. The moment I called out, you stepped in; you made my life large with strength (138:2, 3). Really! There’s no such thing as self-rescue, pulling yourself up by your bootstraps (49:7).

 

Sandhu, T.J. (2013). Walking with God: Praying through footwork metaphors in scripture. Unpublished manuscript.