Weathering the Walk: After a Typhoon

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It is difficult to walk knee deep in debris

Arriving after a super storm, imagining what was, seeing what is left

The littered land, no – the obliterated land

Leveled, uneven, colorless, open-wounded earth

Toppled trees like thousands of arrows released from the sky

Bodies line what might be roads, no one walking

Bodies float as water takes a new course, no one wading

The forecast for Haiyan was serious, the outcome worse

A knock-out punch to the Philippines

In a chapel, bodies wrapped in blankets – feet exposed

A black cross was silent testament to the catastrophe

Survivors screaming to set foot in a makeshift hospital

A child was born in the rubble, new hope

The un-severed umbilical cord of family abroad, a life blood

Thank God for mercy flights

 

Key words rearranged from articles:

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2013/dec/03/typhoon-haiyan-bullit-marquez-in-pictures

http://www.theguardian.com/world/photography-blog/2013/dec/03/bullit-marquez-typhoon-haiyan-philippines

 Photo Source:

https://www.google.com/images?hl=en&q=typhoon+haiyan+bullit+marquez+AP&gbv=2&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ei=WmJcU8SOBM7YyAHj0oHgCA&ved=0CBsQsAQ

 

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Weathering the Walk: During NYC’s “Snow Daze”

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It is difficult to trudge on snowy unplowed sidewalks

Early icy commutes to school on foot

Slipping and falling

Too slick to stand on, let alone travel over

Deserted classrooms, grumbling teachers

Befuddled politicians and bureaucrats

To open or to close, to open or to close

Parents splitting headaches

Stranded buses en route

Breakfast delivered to students stuck inside

School daze

 

Key words rearranged from article and source of photo:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/14/nyregion/for-mayor-keeping-schools-open-brings-another-headache.html?_r=0

A Beloved Boardwalk – Long Beach, NY

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Since 1914, the Long Beach Boardwalk has been the centerpiece of its community.  Known for accessibility and camaraderie, the 2.2 miles of weathered wood planks was a favorite place to walk, run or gather. It was ‘Main Street’ in that quintessential American way.

The original height of eight feet should have protected the boardwalk from the tides during storms. Indeed, it endured many.  But on October 12, 2012, Super Storm Sandy pummeled the boardwalk beyond repair.  It had to be totally rebuilt.

A year later, New York State Governor Cuomo said: “Today the boardwalk is fully reopened, bringing back to the Long Beach community not only an iconic local treasure, but a major tourist attraction that helps supports local businesses and jobs…  One year after the floodwaters caused so much damage and destruction here on Long Island, the newly restored boardwalk is a both a symbol of the resilience and strength of Long Beach as well as the unwavering spirit of the many hard-hit communities across our state that are building back better and stronger than before.”

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1998/11/15/nyregion/different-boardwalks-different-beaches.html

http://www.governor.ny.gov/press/10252013-reopening-long-beach-boardwalk

Photo Source:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=superstorm+sandy+long+beach+boardwalk&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=yy0WU7fsOcmfrAG7xIGoDw&ved=0CCYQsAQ&biw=1366&bih=566