PAN Am Aquatics Swimming (Open Water) Footwork

pan am aquatics open water swimming    Onshore, we see… waves lapping, freestyle arms pulling the swimmers ahead, 3K…4K…5K…back-and-forth…surge and slow…lead, draft, fall-back, one swimmer sprinting ahead of the pack with a strong kick to get to clear water, round the buoys smoothly, a sudden herd of swimmers at the lead swimmers’ feet, trying not to touch them…10K of open water swimming… a marathon.

Sprint Flutter Kick

This fast, up-and-down motion alternates feet. Toes pointed, feet stay submerged, rotating as the body rotates. Feet stay in the narrow path that the head and shoulders have cut through the water. This kick uses a lot of energy so it is best saved for the last part of the open water swim.

Distance Crossover Kick

This slower, less taxing kick is helpful for long events. Swimmers cross their ankles with each (or every other) kick.  The crossover kick is used less for propulsion and more for keeping swimmers in their rhythm and afloat.

Drafting

Etiquette dictates that free riders have to stay back a few inches and not irritate the lead swimmer’s feet. If a competitor keeps touching his feet, the lead swimmer’s gives a few extreme kicks. The competitor gets the message.

Go to PAN AM Schedule – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/open-water-swimming

http://www.enjoy-swimming.com/learn-to-swim.html

http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/a4770731-8cca-49cc-8551-87bfabebf385/CQ%20Open%20Water%20Issue.pdf

http://www.xtri.com/swim-tech/detail/284-itemId.511711564.html

 

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN Am Aquatics Swimming (In Pool) Footwork

pan am swimming in pool    Watching the Pan Am pool’s underwater cameras may be the optimal way to appreciate the depth and variety of footwork in swimming. Subtle, swift moves by both hands and feet propel swimmers along their lanes.

Footwork accompanying various swimming strokes: 

Backstroke: The ‘flutter kick’ entails kicking up and down with alternating legs. The kicking motion originates in the hips. Feet point away from the body.

Breaststroke: ‘Whip kick’ footwork has distinct phases: Initially, a glide of extended legs, close together and toes pointed. Then, knees and feet flex and move towards buttocks, pushing against the water. Next, knees part and feet rotate outwards. Then, legs sweep backwards and outwards, pushing against the water with the inside of feet and lower legs. Legs extend backwards but sweep inwards while feet rotate inward. Legs are now pressed together; feet are nearly in contact. Ready to glide and toes pointed, the new stroke cycle begins.

Butterfly: The swimmer’s legs do a simultaneous whipping motion with feet pointed called a ‘dolphin kick’.  As lower legs moves upward, feet are relaxed under pressure from the water. Alternating, the legs are extended and the feet are pointed during a downward motion creating more propulsion. For a short time, the top of the feet face backwards.

Freestyle (Front Crawl): The simple ‘flutter kick’ continues rhythmically during the whole stroke cycle providing propulsion and stability.

And then there’s the Flip Turn: Swimmers perform an underwater roll at the end of their lap and use their feet to push off from the wall.

Go to….Pan Am Schedule –  http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/swimming

http://www.enjoy-swimming.com/learn-to-swim.html

http://www.swimclub.com.au/resources/articles/swimmers/swimming_at_olympics.html

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM