PAN AM Kayaking Footwork

pan am canoe kayak slalom      Apparently, kayaking is like riding a bike – once you find the balance, you have it forever. This comparison may not work for mistakes en route. An ‘Eskimo Roll’ is an altogether different recovery after capsizing in a kayak compared to falling off a bike and getting back on.

On ‘flatwater’ or in ‘whitewater’, kayakers sit in a cockpit – the kayak’s only opening.  Their legs are stretched out and their feet are stabilized on foot pedals or braces at the front of the kayak.  Kayakers use a double-bladed paddle on both sides of these narrow, light-weight boats. A rudder is under the hull to steer the kayak. The kayaker’s feet control the rudder.

“Push Feet and Paddle for Power”

A good kayak stroke starts at the feet. Feet ignite the power for forward movement. The ball of the foot on the stroke-side pushes firmly against the foot pedal, straightening that leg. The rudder responds by steering in that direction.  The paddler uncoils his torso and spears the water with his blade. Then the next side, alternating. The body of a kayaker is like an engine, driving off the foot pedal, legs pushing and pulling to generate power with the stroke.

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/canoe-kayak-sprint

http://www.toronto2015.org/canoe-kayak-slalom

http://canoekayak.ca/go-paddling/sprint/

http://www.kayakpaddling.net/2-2

http://www.sherrikayaks.com/2011/06/01/use-your-legs-to-improve-your-forward-stroke/

http://www.useakayak.org/strokes/paddling_engine.html

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

   TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

Advertisements

PAN AM Badminton Footwork

pan am badminton      Badminton is a fast, fluid game played by the fleet of foot.  Good footwork is critical to reaching the shuttlecock (birdie) before it drops so the player can hit it from a balanced position. Each move flows seamlessly into the next, and every move is made without hesitation. Players know exactly which footwork patterns to use, without having to think.

Badminton Footwork

Stance:  Standing with feet a little more than shoulder-width apart; the player is poised on the balls of toes, taking the weight off heels. His right foot is a few inches ahead of left foot and he is ready to push off.  His every move has an initial counter-move in the opposite direction. To move forwards, he pushes off backwards with one foot.

Steps: One foot crosses over the other, moving forwards, backwards, sideways, and diagonally. Backwards steps are large and fast.

Chassés:  One foot leads and the other follows but does not cross. Long and low in appearance, chassés allow the player to speed up and move into a jump.

Hitches:  Also called ‘shuffles’ or ‘hops’; players spring lightly and quickly along the ground, mainly using their ankles but not their legs.

Jumping:  The player pushes off with one or both feet and lands on one or both feet.

Lunging:  The lunge is always in the direction of movement underway. The knee must not travel beyond the foot. The back foot is used as a brake.

Split drops:  Also called ‘split steps’, ‘pre-loading hops’, or ‘bounce starts’; they enable the player to move quickly in any direction.

Scissor jumping:  Both feet come off the ground and switch places in the air. The player lands on one foot immediately after the other.

The Danish leap:  The player pushes off from right foot with a powerful leap towards the backhand front corner, turning body while in the air, and landing with a lunge on right foot.

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/badminton

http://www.howtobadminton.com/advantage-good-footwork/

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN AM Athletics – Track and Field Footwork

pan am athletics     A 200 meter foot race called ‘stadion’ was the only event for the first thirteen Olympics more than 2700 years ago. The runners were barefoot (in fact, nude) and they started in a standing position.  The most grueling competition, in those days, was the foot race in full battle armour.  Longer distance running entered the arena of competition in and after the 14th Olympics.

Fast-forward to 2015, track and field athletics are prolific in variety….running short and long distances, jumping high and long, plus several oddball throwing events. There are even combinations of up to ten events performed by one athlete.  Changes overtime are a testimony to athletes’ increasing agility, strength and endurance, not to mention the watching world’s wider arena.

 

Focus: The Footwork of Race Walking

This most unusual of foot races is deceptively difficult. It is called ‘heel and toe’ walking; the heel of the front foot and the toe of the rear foot appear to be in contact with the ground at the same time.  Staying ‘grounded’ is a rule; one foot must be in contact with the ground at all times.  The other rule is that the knee of the leading leg must be straight when the heel strikes the ground until that leg passes under the body. Race walkers speed up and lengthen their strides by swiveling and tilting their hips.

Race Walking judges, positioned around the track, watch for infractions and enforce the rules with yellow and red cards.  As they rely on eye sight alone, there have been calls for technical assistance in judging. A ‘shoe alarm’, triggered when a race walker’s feet were off the ground for more than 30 or 40 milliseconds, was a passing idea.

Go to  – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/athletics

http://www.nba.com/cavaliers/news/ancient_games_funfacts.html

http://www.topendsports.com/events/summer/ancient-events.htm

http://www.centurions1911.org.uk/race-walking-rules.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/11/sports/olympics/olympic-racewalking-is-more-complicated-than-it-seems.html?_r=0

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

   TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN AM Archery Footwork

pan am archery    How much footwork could there be in a sport that values stillness?  Step onto the range and into the archer’s shoes for a moment. The shooting line is parallel to the target line. The archer stands with one foot on either side of the shooting line. The hand holding the bow points towards the target. The centre of the target is directly in line with the archer’s big toes. The setup of his feet ensures greater accuracy.

The ‘Square Stance’:

Stable posture is key. Feet are approximately shoulder width apart. If they were closer or further apart, the archer could sway and thus affect his aim.  His body weight is distributed evenly. His feet are ‘at the root’ of the feeling of ‘being firmly planted’. You would be able to draw a straight line from the top of his head, through his navel to the shooting line between his feet.

Archers using a right hand bow, place their left foot ahead of the shooting line and vice versa. He rotates his feet into the ‘square stance’ with feet parallel to the shooting line. With ‘straight as an arrow’ posture, the archer’s hips and shoulders are ‘in line’ with the direction of aim, perpendicular to the target face.

Once the shooting begins, the feet don’t move.

Go to PAN AM Schedule -http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/archery

http://www.learn-archery.com/archery-stance.html

https://losangelesarchery.wordpress.com/2012/03/19/eye-dominance-and-the-modern-archery-technique/

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

          TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

Pan AM Aquatics Water Polo Footwork

pan am aquatics waterpolo    Picture this: soccer in a pool, goalies at either end, players sprinting as they follow the ball…AND no one is allowed to let their feet touch the bottom at any time.  It takes footwork called Egg-Beater Kicks to keep them up and running.

Egg-Beater Kicks

The faster their feet move, the greater the propulsive forces. This gives the players more height in the water.  During their kicks, the right leg moves counterclockwise and the left leg moves clockwise. These alternating circular movements produce an upward force. Their feet trace an elongated oval path almost touching the back of their thighs during maximal knee flexion, finishing in a low position almost under their hips with their knees almost extended.

This is a contact sport. For good measure, water polo players get their toenails checked before games. The nails must not extend past the tip of the digit.

Go to – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/water-polo

http://waterpolo.isport.com/water-polo-guides/essential-water-polo-gear

http://www.waterpolo.ca/admin/docs/LTAD/EggBeater.pdf

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN AM Aquatics Synchronized Swimming Footwork

pan am aquatics syncho swimming     Poolside, spectators see synchronized dance moves such as twists, pointed toes, splits and lifts. Synchronized swimmers also hold static positions such as the crane, ballet leg double, side fishtail, knight, flamingo, and split positions.

What you don’t see are the Herculean efforts to keep the action above water level.  Below water level, footwork is critical to keep swimmers afloat. Swimmers are penalized if their feet touch the bottom of the pool during the performance. The swimmers must remain buoyant, creating the illusion of standing on their feet or their hands. Their technique is the ‘Egg Beater Kick’.

Footwork of the Egg Beater Kick:

During the kick, the right leg moves counter-clockwise and the left leg moves clockwise. These alternating circular movements produce an upward force. The feet trace an elongated oval path; the faster the feet move the greater the propulsive forces allowing for more height in the water.

Go to….Pan Am Schedule http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources: 

http://www.toronto2015.org/synchronized-swimming

http://www.seattlesynchro.com/SubTabGeneric.jsp?team=zzssst&_stabid_=70269

http://www.waterpolo.ca/admin/docs/LTAD/EggBeater.pdf

http://greatist.com/fitness/15-things-you-didn%E2%80%99t-know-about-synchronized-swimming

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

            TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM

PAN Am Aquatics Swimming (Open Water) Footwork

pan am aquatics open water swimming    Onshore, we see… waves lapping, freestyle arms pulling the swimmers ahead, 3K…4K…5K…back-and-forth…surge and slow…lead, draft, fall-back, one swimmer sprinting ahead of the pack with a strong kick to get to clear water, round the buoys smoothly, a sudden herd of swimmers at the lead swimmers’ feet, trying not to touch them…10K of open water swimming… a marathon.

Sprint Flutter Kick

This fast, up-and-down motion alternates feet. Toes pointed, feet stay submerged, rotating as the body rotates. Feet stay in the narrow path that the head and shoulders have cut through the water. This kick uses a lot of energy so it is best saved for the last part of the open water swim.

Distance Crossover Kick

This slower, less taxing kick is helpful for long events. Swimmers cross their ankles with each (or every other) kick.  The crossover kick is used less for propulsion and more for keeping swimmers in their rhythm and afloat.

Drafting

Etiquette dictates that free riders have to stay back a few inches and not irritate the lead swimmer’s feet. If a competitor keeps touching his feet, the lead swimmer’s gives a few extreme kicks. The competitor gets the message.

Go to PAN AM Schedule – http://www.toronto2015.org/schedule

Resources:

http://www.toronto2015.org/open-water-swimming

http://www.enjoy-swimming.com/learn-to-swim.html

http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/Documents/a4770731-8cca-49cc-8551-87bfabebf385/CQ%20Open%20Water%20Issue.pdf

http://www.xtri.com/swim-tech/detail/284-itemId.511711564.html

 

Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever.   1 Corinthians 9:25 (NIV)

TRAINING – COMPETITION – PODIUM